curious about how to use a book, facts, safety?

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Curious about how to use a book, facts, safety? If you are, buy one. If you can’t buy a book you don’t need to steal; you can always ask for someone to borrowed one or, yes… fascinating, you can go to a library.

I know someone that can give you some advice and tips: Poppet.

  1. If you really really want to read a novel and can’t afford it, ask the author for a review copy. This a trade where you review the novel when you’ve read it.
    To review a novel, post a review on Goodreads, or where you would normally buy it, Amazon / B&N / Kobo / iTunes / bookstores with websites which allow reviews – and if you have a blog review it there too, or share it with your Facebook friends, letting them know about the book and why you needed to read it.
  2. You don’t have to give it 5 stars and say you loved it, if you didn’t. Just be honest, but leave a review as payment to the author for the novel
  3. You can get free books on Amazon every day of the week, hundreds of them. *don’t steal books*.
  4. Amazon have a lending library, join the lending library, or even better, ask your local library to stock it – they stock eBooks too!
  5. Leave a review 😛 Authors love that shit.

You can find more about her at Poppet’s Imagination Captivation.

a random interview to chris kelso

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Chris Kelso is a spectacle to move the mind, soul, and heart. The books that I’ve read are filled with power.
His words are in many ways a bridge of hope to insanity.
And I’ve only read so far two books – shame on me.
Some words about the book “Schadenfreude”…

After reading so many books most of them do not provide any surprise.
Of course now I demand from a book much more than I required a few years ago. And it was spectacular that “Schadenfreude” by Chris Kelso has astonished me positively. It is a book that don’t leave me indifferent – one great good thing!

I’ve also read the anthology “Caledonia Dreamin’ – Strange Fiction of Scottish Descent” edited by Hal Duncan and Chris Kelso.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

I think I’ve developed a certain ‘style’. It started with me at 18 trying to replicate my favourite prose stylists, writers with really unique and individual voices – like Burroughs, Acker, PKD and Hubert Selby Jr. There is some fix-up, some spare Carver-esque writing and some longwinded stuff. Usually the poetry of the piece will take precedence, I’ll likely revel in words more than plot or actual character expansion.
The more I read, and wrote, the more the narrative and its structure started to amalgamate all those influences and became something (maybe) unique itself.

the dissolving zinc theatre

the dissolving zinc theatre

2. What books have most influenced your life most?

There are so many. Paul Auster’s ‘New York Trilogy’, Alasdair Gray’s ‘Lanark’…anything from PKD, Simak, Solzhenitsyn, Acker or Plath. Seriously, too much stuff!

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

This is a good question. I suppose at university I had Stewart Home and Rodge Glass to bounce a few ideas off of and get useful feedback. Since then, I suppose people like Hal Duncan, Anna Tambour, Gio Clairval and Vincenzo Bilof have really taken me under their wing. Seb Doubinsky and Matt Bialer are always on hand to help me out and keep me on the right track too. I’m grateful to them all.

4. What are your current projects?

So many! I have a book ‘The Folger Variation’ due out through Leaky Boot Press’s ‘Weirdo Magnet’ imprint. It’s a much more traditional science fiction fare. Then it’s my horror/crime novel that Adam Millard is putting out. I’m really excited about that one because it’s such a deviation for me. It’s still bleak as fuck, but more accessibly bleak….

5. How much research do you do?

Hardly any. The majority of my fiction takes place in a 4th dimensional universe where humans work as slaves in mining enclaves all day. I might research a piece of machinery that I’m elaborating on, but very little else. It’s all up here (points to temple)

the folger variation

the folger variation

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

Very much part-time. By day I work in a school library, which is actually very enjoyable. I love the school and it’s pretty satisfying. I think even if I could afford to write full-time I wouldn’t. I’m drying up a bit these days. I write a lot less than I used to. Maybe I’ve said everything I had to say?

7. Where do your ideas come from?

My own desperate misery. These days I’m much happier and positive – which might explain why I can’t write anything of note anymore!

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

They can visit my website at – http://www.chris-kelso.com
or add me on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/chris.kelso.75

For full Books list visit – BOOKSSSSSSS

clairvoyant interview to daniel mills

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I had a lot of expectations before reading “Revenants: A Dream of New England”, and I must admit now that I was pleasantly surprised! A simple conclusion: if I want to know about reality I will watch the news; if I get tired, and I get tired all the time, of hearing about the “real” brutality of the world then I just need to read Daniel Mills. If this don’t makes any sense is normal, but all makes sense to me.

Thanks to Jason E. Rolfe for making me read Daniel Mills. Is an author worth following.

 

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

I do, I think. At least I hope so.

For me the cultivation of a unique, authentic voice ought to be any writer’s foremost concern, and the truth is I spent many years working to develop a style of my own. Only with Revenants did I come to feel as though I had accomplished this, if only in part, and even now style continues to be something of an obsession to the extent that I have come to value authenticity of voice and spontaneity of expression over mere craftsmanship.

Regrettably, it has become something of a truism among writers and writing programs that “writing for one’s self” is an essentially self-indulgent activity — a shame, really, because the reality is that none of us are going to be read or remembered in, say, 500 years’ time, so you may as well do your best to be true to your own style rather than writing to please others or (Heaven help us!) writing for the market.

Even as a reader, I find that I would much rather read a book that is stylistically distinct but flawed — singular if also imperfect — than another that is well-crafted but essentially workmanlike. I’m reminded of the dismissals we regularly encounter of HP Lovecraft’s style. There are many writers out there who would have us believe HPL is a poor writer simply because his work doesn’t “tick the boxes,” as it were, with regard to plotting, adjective/adverb use, character building, etc. I see these arguments and I think to myself: yes, but surely that’s the point? You pick up a Lovecraft story to read and you are never once in doubt about its author — the unity of style, voice, and vision is so distinctive, so complete.

Another example can be found in the novels of Walter M. Miller, JR. His first novel – A Canticle for Leibowitz – is an undisputed masterpiece while his second – Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman – was left unfinished at the time of his suicide. Saint Leibowitz was later finished by Terry Bisson and released after Miller’s death to a very muted reception indeed. Certainly Saint Leibowitz is a tortured work, one that is deeply flawed in execution, but as such, it somehow seems to contain more of Miller himself, his distinct vision of sin, grace, and redemption.

And though Canticle is unquestionably the “better” book, I have read it only once while I reread Saint Leibowitz every 3-4 years.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Like most other readers, I have a cherished handful of books which I continually read and reread, which have become so deeply enmeshed within the fabric of my life that I would be hard pressed to qualify their influence on me in any meaningful way. Suffice it to say that I have lived in the cold snow country of Yasunari Kawabata’s novel of the same name and likewise experienced the oppressive summer heat of LP Hartley’s The Go-Between. I have witnessed the hypocrisy of Victorian society as evidenced by Samuel Butler’s The Way of All Flesh and lay awake listening for the dead voices that haunt Juan Rulfo’s Pedro Paramo. And that’s not to mention the weeks and months I have devoted to unraveling the riddles of Charles Palliser’s The Quincunx and Rustication.

Other books that have influenced me would include Par Lagerkvist’s Barabbas, Hesse’s Demian, Miller’s Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman, Breece D’J Pancake’s The Stories of Breece D’J Pancake, Pinckney Benedict’s Dogs of God, and Isak Dinesen’s Seven Gothic Tales.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Lovecraft again springs to mind. Here was a man who wrote what he wanted in the way he wanted and who devoted his entire life to his art though it meant an existence characterized by near-constant poverty. Unlike Dickinson or Kafka — who might also be said to embody this artistic ideal — HPL was a man who had fallen behind his own time rather than leap out ahead of it ala Dickinson or embody it fully ala Kafka.

For this reason I cannot help but relate to the sense of poignant dislocation which so pervades his work, that yearning for a different time. Yes, his opinions on race (among other topics) are abhorrent but he was by almost all accounts a gentleman of great personal kindness, courtesy, integrity, who served as mentor to a generation of young weird/ horror writers. In many ways he was broken — it would be difficult to argue otherwise — but I’m broken too, as are we all, and for me, it is this sense of brokenness as we encounter it in his work that keeps me coming back to him.

4. What are your current projects?

I spent much of 2013 and 2014 working on a new Gothic novel addressing the American Spiritualist movement in the wake of the American Civil War. In addition to this I have continued to work on short stories, a number of which are forthcoming later this year in such venues as Aickman’s Heirs (ed. Simon Strantzas), Autumn Cthulhu (ed. Mike Davis), Leaves of a Necronomicon (ed. Joseph S. Pulver, Sr) and Nightscript I (ed. C.M. Muller).

5. How much research do you do?

A bit of a difficult question. I’ve mentioned my own feelings of dislocation and general disaffection with modern society — “I just wasn’t made for these times” as Brian Wilson has it — and the sad fact is that I spend altogether too much time fetishizing the past, whether that’s devouring Victorian novels or old religious tracts or haunting the historic houses and graveyards of Vermont. In other words: the research is always ongoing if only for the simple reason that I don’t think of it as “research.”

For example I’ve lately become obsessed with the lives of Horatio Spafford and Philip Bliss, who wrote the words and music, respectively, to the well-known 19th century hymn “It is Well with my Soul.” Spafford was moved to write the words following the loss of his four daughters in the wreck of The Ville de Havre — one of the great calamities of its day — and Bliss later supplied the music mere months before his own tragic death in the Ashtabula River Rail Disaster. Will I ever do anything with this? Probably not. All the same it is fascinating.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

Part-time.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

I believe in genuine inspiration — or “the muse” as it’s traditionally understood — but I tend to see it as an ongoing process rather than any kind of epiphany. Routine is important. During the course of each day I try to make time for the things that fascinate and move me. This could mean a walk in the woods or an undistracted hour spent listening to music or even just twenty minutes of stolen reading time on my daily commute to work. In this way I try to make a habit of beauty in all things so that I’m charged with inspiration when I sit down to work. I don’t always succeed at this, of course, and Lord knows I’m as bad as anyone else at making time for writing, but this way at least I don’t have to worry about feeling inspired.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

You can find me online at http://www.daniel-mills.net where I maintain a bibliography and blog or find me in the usual places: Facebook, Goodreads, etc. If you happen to live in the USA, there’s a good chance you can find my novel Revenants at your local library. Similarly you can try to track me down in person at Readercon or this year’s Necronomicon in Providence, RI.

melodious interview to teri lee kline

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Just knowing Teri Lee Kline by what she writes is easy to see that she’s full of vitality, humanity and with a heart of an intoxicating sweetness. She is also a writer that can, easily, dazzled me. See, for instance, the work “Snakes At His Feet”.

A while ago I did a little acrostic with the word Teri, and here it is:
Today we
embrace with
rejoicing the
illuminated presence of Teri Lee Kline.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing is intensely personal. I try to go directly to the heart of the matter. This is especially important, for obvious reasons, in very short fiction. This does hold true for me, however, regardless of the form I am utilizing. My longer fiction, creative non-fiction, journalistic pieces and even the interviews I conduct have this as the hallmark, as well. My heart is forever on my sleeve for all to see.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

When, in my youth, I read To Kill a Mockingbird and The Grapes of Wrath I was unalterably set on a course to view the world in a certain way. They were monumental books for my education and evolving character. Then, as a teenager, reading To The Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, The Waves, A Room of One’s Own, I was blown away with the possibilities in language, words, and literature. It was after reading these Virginia Woolf classics that I began my lifelong love affair with reading and writing. Lastly, James Agee’s A Death in the Family, my favorite novel, taught me about writing from the truest depth of my heart, how to evoke mood, and power. Phenomenal book.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I consider teachers, more than other writers, my mentors. I had a teacher in my youth, Mrs. Delphine Johnson, who recognized in me an innate talent for expressing myself through the written word. She was the first to identify this and encouraged me throughout my school years. My English professor at the University of Minnesota worked endlessly with me and was at my side when I won the Best Freshman Writer scholarship that year. I will never forget these teachers. Of late, a dear friend, Jason Rolfe, encouraged me to submit my work for publication. He is a wonderful writer, mentor and mensch! I am forever indebted to him.

4. What are your current projects?

I always have several projects brewing at any given moment. Presently, I am collecting my very short fiction pieces and will begin the process of looking for a publisher. I am also at work on a book length project about very small towns of the world. I also love conducting interviews and doing profiles of writers and artists. I usually have one of those in the works. I would love to start my own journal of food related fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and photography. I’m working towards that goal, as well.

5. How much research do you do?

It depends on the project, but I normally choose projects that do not require much research.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

I write as often as I can. My notebook is ever ready.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

My ideas come from many places: my observations of people, from observing nature, from my dreams, from stories in the news. Most often my best ideas come to me when I am in that blessed and magical state between wakefulness and sleep. It is usually in moments of silence that my muse speaks.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

I have found Facebook and Twitter to be useful tools for connecting with readers and especially with other writers and artists. My posts are generally very personal in nature. People respond well to this and for this I am pleased and grateful. I am quite new to the world of publishing so therefore do not have a long list of credits. I was very happy to be featured on the pages of Literary Orphans multiple times, Sein und Werden and also, the Utter Nonsense issue of the international journal of experimental and absurdist literature and art, The Black Scat Review.

magical interview to sissy pantelis

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I first met Sissy Pantelis in The Ironic Fantastic # 1, the story “Hunted”; it was love at first letter – two “first” can be a redundancy, but it was what I could write.
She creates the most charming stories that I’ve read with words that are endearing and amusing. I can feel, always, alive the sense of wonder and imagination that inhabited Sissy’s heart and mind; completely drawn into her worlds don’t knowing if I am going to cry, laugh… hypnotic and touching words she have.
“How fine is the line between fantasy and reality? And if we unleash our imaginations, just how far will they take us?” – answers that can be found at Sissy’s stories.Shame on me for not knowing her soon – but the fault is all mine.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

I always try to write clearly for the readers. My priority is to be understood – not to make beautiful, long sentences. I don’t think that my style is literary and complicated. I prefer short, clear sentences that people can understand and I try to keep writing in this style. I am also very attentive to rhythm issues – but this is something intuitive, I cannot explain it rationally. I am not good at long narratives and long and complicated descriptions, so I try to avoid them.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream. All fairy tales and mythology- maybe Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales more than the rest. Greek mythology and Aesope’s myths. And the Brothers Karamazov by Dostoievsky – Crime and Punishment too. When I read Dostoievsky, I felt something difficult to put in words- like an earthquake in my head. I have always loved everything by Oscar Wilde and my philosophy is very much influenced by the Tao Te Ching and the Taoist Philosophers (NOT the religion – the philosophy).

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Oscar Wilde. Also Hans Christian Andersen (he also was a major influence for Oscar Wilde) and Shakespeare with Midsummer Night’s Dream. I have found out that many of my stories were influenced or inspired (even at a sub conscious level) by Midsummer Night’s Dream).

4. What are your current projects?

My comics. If you want to know more about them, please read my interview here:
http://forums.jazmaonline.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7235

blue sparkles

blue sparkles

Her current comics projects are, and quoting:

Blue Sparkles is a story of a cursed love. The two young lovers escape to Dreamland to be together, but even there, it seems that the curse follows them. The story is inspired by Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, one of the major influences on my imagination. Art in Blue Sparkles is by wonderful French artist Aurore Barois (aka VURORE).

Red Nightmare is a story about change and its consequences. It is a story of a cruel king, who decides to change after a hallucination he has while he visits a witch (whom he tortures at first). It is also about being at peace with your own self, about inner harmony. I found out that it was a very important thing and maybe one of the most difficult tasks one can attempt in his lifetime. Now, Red Nightmare is NOT a philosophy book; it is a fairy tale featuring anthropomorphic animals. As all my stories, it is first aimed to entertain and make readers dream. But change has always been an important factor in my life and the main theme of this story is change. The artist working on this story is Italian artist Danilo Antoniucci. I am extremely happy and honored that Danilo accepted this collaboration. I love his art, but I am not the only one to admire Danilo’s talent, so he has a lot of work with his own comics and I can only be grateful that he also works with me.

Dark Siren is the story of a young girl that discovers that she has a wonderful gift, but her gift can harm other people – especially those who offend her. The young girl is scared, so she leaves her home fearing she may inadvertently harm her family. Then she finds out that she is not alone to possess that kind of poisonous gift. Dark Siren is a special story to me. First, there is something of me in the main character of the story. For a long while, I thought that dreaming and writing was a sort of curse cast on me… To come back to Dark Siren, my young niece helped me a lot in making the story and gave me many ideas for the plot; that was a wonderful experience. And last (but not least), the artist working on this story is José Leonardo aka The Chulo. José is from Colombia and his style is very special. I believe that José has really given this story another dimension. He is extremely gifted and he is now also working on the characters of a movie (by the people who did How to Train Your Dragon).

I have other projects- among other things, I have one or two novels in mind, but that will be for much later so we would rather speak about them in the future than now.

5. How much research do you do?

Quite a lot actually. Most of my stories are pure fantasy and the true things in them are very few, but I need to do a lot of research to get inspiration.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

I write full time and I don’t wish to change this – writing is a passion and doing something else at the same time is a big mistake, I found out at a great cost a few years back.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

I am not sure. Sometimes from fairy tales; but I also get a lot of ideas by listening to music or through my dreams!!! 🙂

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

I am on Deviant Art: http://gliovampire.deviantart.com – I try to keep the journal updated when anything new comes out.
I am also on FB: https://www.facebook.com/sissy.pantelis and this is my author page:
hhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Sissy-Pantelis/232168253548554
I have also created a page for Blue Sparkles:
https://www.facebook.com/PuckBlueSparkles
and José and I created a page for Dark Siren:
https://www.facebook.com/darksirengn

If you want to follow my work, you are welcome to follow any of those pages and I am always happy to see comments and answer any questions of the readers.

unlikely interview to poppet

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From “Moonshine Express” I already wrote...

A story, told in two hands, full of wonderful words, where each sentence is packed with poetry. The narration in the first person brings another taste to the story and the ending is not an ending, but the beginning of all – wonderful.

… it was my first contact with this writer and what contact – it burns!

Since then I’ve read other works and it has always been an enjoyable read; although I recognize that some of her stories are for a more feminine public. Is the woman inside me who is talking.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

Yes. My style is very much an internal private monologue whilst the characters interact with the cameo and other characters. Because of this my novels are almost always written in first person.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Horror writing has probably had the biggest impact on me. It’s odd that, because I found a medical case study on how we form memories (doing research into what I consider a form of lunacy), and the memories we don’t forget are the traumatic ones, we hardly ever remember the good times because we’re hard wired to remember the worst times. As such the fact that I can recall almost every horror novel I’ve ever read, tells me it’s the best way to influence a world. People will remember you if you’re horrific. From an early age I loved horror novels (and movies. Books like The Amityville Horror (based on a true story), then older I found Dean Koontz and Stephen King. I loved Koontz’s Phantoms, and Night Chills. However I also enjoyed action novels and the dystopian kind (like 1984 by George Orwell), I fell in love with novels like Cujo (Stephen King), The Freedom Trap (Desmond Bagley), The Omen (David Seltzer), Ninja (Eric Van Lustbader).

You can tell how old I am by the books I’ve listed here as being influential on me. At that time Jilly Cooper, Jackie Collins, Danielle Steel, and Shirley Conran, were all the rage for women to be reading (and things like Valley of the Dolls) – yet I read those books and they left zero impact. I always found books written by men, for men, far more action packed, intelligent, and engaging. I’m not dissing those other authors, they write excellent stories, but the love/scandal genre was something I only dabbled in once I hit my thirties. I found I could only write love stories in a paranormal setting, with a hint of horror in each and every one.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I haven’t had personal dealings with any author who ended up being a mentor, but I can say that Charles De Lint’s combining Urban Fantasy with Legend and folklore really gave me the courage to write in this genre myself. Never before had I come across an author doing what he was doing, and subsequently he became my favourite author.

4. What are your current projects?

Too many to list. Having a day job means I rarely have the time to write all the stories already begun and waiting on my computer.

poppet

5. How much research do you do?

Probably too much. I take research to the nth degree.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

I used to write full time and loved it, it made me so very happy, but now I only write part time as I have other responsibilities now.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

Everywhere. Anything can spark an idea, even a song. But mostly my inspiration comes from dreams. IE last night I dream I was distracting a serial killer away from my best friend and a work colleague of hers, so she could get away, and it was like being in a murder mystery because I overheard him on the phone, he’d set the whole thing up, he never wanted her after all. This was his experiment.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

I have audiobooks available now, with a horror due out in March (audiobook), you can find my work in paperback and ebook format, or you can peruse my websites or my publishers websites (Wild Wolf Publishing, Thorstruck Press, Eibonvale Press). You can also follow me on Facebook for snippets from upcoming novels and new releases

https://authorpoppet.wordpress.com
http://authorpoppet.weebly.com

http://www.thorstruckpress.com
http://www.eibonvalepress.co.uk
http://wildwolfpublishing.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poppet/197111090356326

inconvenient interview to jason e. rolfe

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My first contact with the writing of Jason E. Rolfe occurred when I bought (30.05.2013) the novel Synthetic Saints published by Vagabond Press Books. At that time I didn’t know that he “was a French writer and humorist born in Honfleur, Calvados. He was the author of many collections of whimsical writings. A poet as much as a humorist, he cultivated the verse form known as holorhyme…oh wait, that’s Alphonse Allais. This bio is for who? Jason E. Rolfe? I have no idea who that is.” – bio found at Sein und Werden (Now We Are Ten).

“Jason E. Rolfe is a worthy successor to Alphonse Allais” – Norman Conquest

Jason is someone that can turn my gloomy days into sunny days, because he’s not only fascinating as a writer but as a person.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

Not really. I like to think of myself as an absurdist, but the truth is I’m not purely absurd. I’ve been called “darkly comic”, which sounds good to me.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Well, I’m easily influenced so it’s difficult to say. I’ve evolved as a reader, and as a result I’ve changed considerably as a writer. I would say the books that have influenced me the most as a writer have been “Incidences” by Daniil Kharms and “I Am a Phenomenon Quite Out of the Ordinary: The Notebooks, Diaries and Letters of Daniil Kharms” edited by Anthony Anemone and Peter Scotto, along with “The World of Alphonse Allais” translated and edited by Myles Kingston and “The Best of Myles” by Myles na Gopaleen (Flann O’Brien). In terms of the “life” influence in your question, I would say Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” sits atop a pile that also includes Daumal’s “A Night of Serious Drinking” and “You’ve Always Been Wrong”. There are many, many others I’ve been influenced by, but these are the biggest.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Although they likely don’t see themselves this way, I would consider Rhys Hughes and Brendan Connell mentors. I respect what they do and value what they say, and have frequently been inspired by their unique works. In a roundabout sort of way I also consider Alphonse Allais and Daniil Kharms mentors in that I study their work, try to understand it and them, and hope to apply the lessons I learn to my own writing.

4. What are your current projects?

Ugh. I have been plugging away at a Vienna novel for several years now. It’s certainly an absurd thing. My goal is to have it done this year. I’m working on a collection of short stories as well. A number of the stories have already been published (you can catch some of them in the nonsense issue of Black Scat Review, which is still available from Black Scat Books!). It would be nice to have those two things done and submitted by the end of 2015, but we’ll see. I have an essay I really want to finish, and some editorial projects I need to wrap up too.

5. How much research do you do?

It depends. I did very little research while writing the stories in “An Inconvenient Corpse”. I’ve done loads of research while working on my Vienna novel. I suppose it depends on the type of story. The incidents in “An Inconvenient Corpse” were less about the detail and more about the point I was trying to make with them. If the detail has a role in the story I’ll research it. If not, I probably won’t bother.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

Is there something less than part-time? Because if there is, that’s what I write. I have a full time job, I’m a full-time parent, I’m taking university courses part-time, and I’m devoutly lazy, so writing usually gets lost in the shuffle.

7. Where do your ideas come from?
ee669

Again it depends. The ideas that spawned “An Inconvenient Corpse” were, for the most part, inspired by people and incidents in my life. Two of them, “Unknown Famous Writer” and “A Heavy Burden” were inspired by posts I read on Facebook, oddly enough. The stories in my Vienna novel were inspired by historical events while my Daniil Ivanovich stories are inspired by the (all-too-easy to prove) belief that the world is complete and utter nonsense.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

They can follow me on Facebook (which I frequent far too frequently given the lack of time I have for other things), Twitter (if and when I remember my password), and on my blog (www.jasonrolfe.wordpress.com). They’re more than welcome to pick up my short collection, “An Inconvenient Corpse”, which is #30 in Black Scat Books’ “Absurdist Texts & Documents” series.

flash fiction magazine

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Hi paulo,

Many thanks for submitting your flash fiction, which will be up and active on the site on the 30th December. We usually post some time around 12:00 GMT, 7:00 EST, for max blogging impact.

We tweet and post to facebook and google+ when your work is first published, but do feel free to use the share buttons at the bottom of your work’s page to connect with your own followers on these and other social networking sites.

Since you’ve had a flash fiction piece accepted, you’re very welcome to show off this fact on your own weblog or anywhere else you can paste html … Feel free to go to Featured Author Extras to pick up the code.

Since we do get a lot of submissions, we tend to operate on the principle of not accepting further submissions from a writer for a couple of months, just to give everybody a chance…

Uma história minha foi aceite para publicação no site Flash Fiction Magazine.

um dos melhores momentos do ano

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Coloco o link para o programa de rádio Giggle & Gossip no qual Fiona Duffin falou do projecto The Ironic Fantastic e de moi. Um momento muito gratificante. Adorei. Um dos pontos altos deste ano.

O programa pode ser ouvido no MixCloud, aqui.

Aproveito para fornecer o link para duas antologias que têm textos meus.

bsr8

black scat books – seduction

black scat review #8

oulipo pornobongo 3: anthology of erotic wordplay

Ambas publicadas pela excelente editora Black Scat Books

the ironic fantastic

rhys hughes
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About

The IRONIC FANTASTIC is a proposed series of ebook anthologies that will showcase international absurdist, quirky, unusual, whimsical and ironic fiction from new and established writers. Each issue will appear irregularly and it will always be free. This project was inaugurated by the writer Rhys Hughes.

I’m after fantastical/absurdist ‘comedies’ 1000 words or less. By ‘comedies’ I don’t mean that they have to be funny: wistful, thoughtful and droll are fine, so are weird and quirky. I’m thinking of a broader definition of the term, in the same way that Nabokov’s brilliant Laughter in the Dark is a ‘comedy’ but it didn’t make me laugh…

As an example: the early stories of Kafka and Calvino, Bruno Schulz, Hašek, Daniil Kharms, Zamyatin, Pavi?, Queneau, Bulgakov, Boris Vian, etc.

I want ideas! Funny ideas, absurd ideas, intelligently daft ideas! Poetry and images are more than welcome too. So are brief dramatic ‘scenes’.

words by Rhys Hughes

ironic

the ironic fantastic #1 & #2

Links/Contacts:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IronicFantastic

The Ironic Fantastic #1

Download link, here.

The Ironic Fantastic #2

Download link, here.

The Ironic Fantastic #3

the-ironic-fantastic

the ironic fantastic #3

The Ironic Fantastic #3 will be available in the first week of September, 2014.
The download link at Lulu.

The Ironic Fantastic #4

I will be editing the fourth installment of The Ironic Fantastic. The submission deadline will be September 30. Issue #4 will be a tribute to Lewis Carroll, but all nonsense is welcome. If you’re looking for inspiration, you can start here! http://www.lewiscarroll.org/carroll

Please send all submissions to theironicfantastic4@gmail.com

by Jason E. Rolfe

I am extending the deadline for the Lewis Carroll-inspired issue #4 until the end of October. We are also accepting submissions for issue #5 (early 2015). That will not be a themed issue, so if you have anything ironic and/or fantastic you’d like us to consider, please send it along to either Paulo Brito or Jason Rolfe any time!

by Jason E. Rolfe

Dear Readers and Writers. Personal issues and constraints on time have conspired against me, and have caused a long (and ongoing) delay in the release of the Lewis Carroll issue of Ironic Fantastic. Rest assured that we will get this issue out. In the meantime, a non-themed issue of Ironic Fantastic will be released. Your patience has been duly noted and greatly appreciated! If you have any questions at all, please feel free to contact us directly. If you wish to submit to the NEW next issue of Ironic Fantastic, please do!

by Jason E. Rolfe


The Ironic Fantastic #5

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the ironic fantastic #5

The download link at Lulu.

several things

rhys hughes
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1.bitoque
I was going happily do a piercing like Kseniya Modelling. The tattoo artist told me:
– I can’t do it Paulo!
– But why?
– First, you don’t have a belly button, instead you got there a Mariana Trench. Second with all that potbelly you don’t need a piercing but a anchor. Third…
– Shut up… Can I put a nose piercing?
– No. First, you don’t have a nose but a tubular bell. Second those hair leaving the nose…

I left the store and I went to do some hair removal.

2.bitoque
I went to to the gym to get some exercise, but I have been obstructed at the door. Perhaps it was because I was eating bonbons.

rhys hughes

rhys hughes

3.bitoque
Finally, and after 5 months, I’m ready to finish a story with only 3000 words. I lost more time in getting info to make the story more real but also more fantastic because I blend all the elements.

And tonight I want to dream that I’m driving a Euro 4000 – the most powerful diesel-electric locomotive.